Ulcers

Much of the attention on treating ulcers has been focused on a new and expensive drug to treat ulcers. While I am not an advocate of treating ulcers with drugs, I am excited to see more focus put on this common condition. As many of my clients know, I put a huge emphasis on the […]

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The Equine Stomach

I was able to attend a fantastic lecture on the equine stomach at the 2003 AAEP convention. A. M. Merritt, DVM, MS shared the latest research on this topic. Here are just a few of the things I discovered. This information is particularly valuable in understanding why the horse is so prone to gastric ulcers […]

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Spasmotic and Gas Colic

I am discussing these two types of colics together because they have similar causes and presenting symptoms. Improper digestion from various causes is responsible for these colics. Stress from nervousness, weather changes, feed changes, and overwork can result in spasmotic or gas colic. To explain why the horse is so sensitive we must again look […]

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More on Bleeding in Performance Horses (EIPH)

After sending out a previous newsletter about EIPH I received quite a bit of feedback suggesting additional causes of bleeding in race and performance horses. The most interesting was the possibility that bleeding from the lungs was the result of asphyxia, or lack of oxygen. This theory was first advanced by Dr. James Rooney in […]

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Leaky Gut Syndrome

Conventional western veterinarians are now recognizing and treating equine ulcers more frequently. With increased awareness of this syndrome, more horses are routinely being given antacids and acid blocking drugs. These medications may temporarily give relief only to set the horse up for more serious chronic health problems. The mucosal lining of the digestive tract is […]

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Laminitis

Laminitis or inflammation of the equine hoof is a serious condition. In its acute presentation, prompt aggressive treatment aimed at relieving the inflammation and removing the predisposing cause will prevent any permanent damage to the foot. The chronic laminitis case unfortunately presents more of a challenge. Most chronic laminitis cases present with some degree of […]

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Internal Adhesions

I recently completed my certification in Equine Osteopathy and one of the most valuable aspects of this course has been the emphasis on internal causes of external problems. In other words, many of the problems we see externally in the spine and musculoskeletal system actually originate from problems with the internal organs and the connective […]

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Inflammatory Airway Disease (IAD)

When most horse owners think of lower respiratory disease they think of serious conditions such as pneumonia or heaves. Performance horse owners, on the other hand, realize that low grade inflammation in the lower respiratory tract can cause trouble long before obvious clinical signs are apparent. A mild cough with a slight mucous discharge might […]

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Impaction Colic

This is the most common form of colic I see in horses. It can usually be resolved if treated early but can become life threatening if poorly managed. To understand why horses are so prone to impaction colic one only needs to look at the anatomy of their digestive tract. The large colon of the […]

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Exercise Induced Pulmonary Hemorrhage (EIPH)

In this month’s newsletter I explore exercise induced pulmonary hemorrhage (or EIPH), a condition that can become a concern for performance horse owners. When people think of a horse with EIPH, also known as a "bleeder," they often visualize blood streaming from the nostrils. Although this extreme condition can occur, many horses "bleed" without showing […]

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